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Study guide Mathew- LAD Rosary

Matthew Bible study- via LAD Rosary

Matthew 6:9–13, Part 1

Your Kingdom Come

January 1, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:9–13
Topic: Prayer
Series: The Lord’s Prayer

Principle for Bible Reading

In five short verses in Matthew, Jesus taught us to pray. There are prayer-life-changing glories to be seen in these most familiar words if we slow down enough to see them. In this lab, John Piper begins a three-part series on the Lord’s Prayer.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–01:04)

Our Father in Heaven (01:04–03:10)

1.      Who can say “our” Father (Matthew 6:9)? The fatherhood of God is established by the relationship we have with Jesus (John 8:42). Do you love Jesus?
2.      Jesus came into the world to remove the wrath of God against us and welcome us into God’s family as children.
3.      Everything in this prayer comes to us from a loving Heavenly Father.

Hallowed Be Your Name (03:10–05:42)

1.      When we hallow (“sanctify”) God’s name we do not make him good or holy (the way God sanctifies us). (Matthew 6:9)
2.      To hallow God’s name doesn’t merely mean to regard him as good and holy, either, because even the demons regarded him as holy. (Mark 1:24)
3.      To hallow God’s name means something more—to love him, honor him, value him, treasure him above all else.

Your Kingdom Come (05:42–08:23)

1.      God is already the king over all things. His rule has already been established in all the earth (Psalm 103). But there seems to be a way in which his kingdom has not come. (Matthew 6:10)
2.      Isn’t God’s sovereign will done at all times and in all places? Yes, but clearly there’s a way in which his will is not yet done on the earth.
3.      How do the angels (“as it is in heaven”) do his will? The angels always obey God’s commands perfectly and joyfully.
4.      Therefore, this prayer is a prayer that God would continue transforming the world into a place where everyone obeys him perfectly and joyfully.

Prayer (08:23–09:19)

Study Questions

1.      When can someone pray (with integrity) “Our Father in heaven …”? Can you think of other verses in the Bible that would help people know if God is their Father?


2.      Why does Jesus tell us to pray for God’s kingdom when God has always been King? He has always ruled everything and everything in it, so in what way does his kingdom still have to come?


3.      Write out a short prayer to God applying what you’ve learned studying these verses.

‘The Lord’s Prayer’ Series

This lab is part of a series through Jesus’s prayer in Matthew 6:9–13. If we are going to learn to be alone with God in prayer, we need to slow down and mine everything we can from this short lesson Jesus gave his disciples. John Piper reveals several key insights he has seen in these verses over the years. Visit ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ series page to see all three labs in this series.

Related Resources

•      The Deepest Desire of the Christian Heart (article)
•      How Does Scripture Serve Our Prayers? (interview)
•      Our Deepest Prayer: Hallowed Be Your Name (sermon on Matthew 6)

Matthew 6:9–13, Part 2

Deliver Us from Evil

January 6, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:9–13
Topic: Prayer
Series: The Lord’s Prayer

Principle for Bible Reading

Jesus’s prayer for you is clear: Today, you need God to provide for you, forgive you, and deliver you. Every single day, you need God to move in these three ways. In this lab, John Piper unfolds these simple, but critical prayers.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–00:57)

Our Daily Bread (00:57–01:44)

1.      Jesus tells us to pray for our basic needs. We do not need more and more things.
2.      Simplicity and necessity (“daily bread”) are the prayer because there is so much temptation in wealth and excess. Accumulation is not evil, but it very easily can become so.
3.      Jesus’s prayer for “daily bread” stands for all our needs. It’s an admission that we are human and need provision from God to survive.

Forgive Us Our Debts (01:44–06:00)

1.      Why can Jesus compare our forgiving of others with our being forgiving? Isn’t that works righteousness? (Matthew 6:12). No, Jesus is not saying we are earning forgiveness, but asking that we would be forgiven in a way that correlates with the way we forgive each other.
2.      Those who do not forgive others are foolish, unwise, and will be miserable.
3.      If our heart says it is a good, beautiful, desirable thing to forgive others, it will call down forgiveness from God for our own sin.

Lead us Not Into Temptation (06:00–08:52)

1.      Jesus states this prayer negatively and positively. Negatively: “Lead us not into temptation.…” Positively: “… deliver us from evil.” (Matthew 6:13)
2.      All pleasure in this life is a test from God laced with temptation from Satan. Will we idolize this pleasure or thank God for it and consider him as more valuable than this pleasure?
3.      In the same way, all pain in this life is a test from God laced with temptation from Satan. Will we trust God in his infinite wisdom, power, and love or will we curse him?
4.      Therefore, this prayer is asking God to keep every test from ensnaring us in Satan’s temptations. God, deliver us from this pain or pleasure becoming destructive to our faith in you.

Prayer (08:52–09:56)

Study Questions

1.      In Matthew 6:11, why is Jesus’s prayer for “daily bread”? Why “bread”? What was he trying to communicate? And why “daily”?


2.      Explain the “as” in the middle of Matthew 6:12. In what way could a holy God possibly forgive us as we sinners forgive others?


3.      How does it work when God “delivers us from evil” (Matthew 6:13)? What would it look like in your life if God answered that prayer today? Try to be specific.

‘The Lord’s Prayer’ Series

This lab is part of a series through Jesus’s prayer in Matthew 6:9–13. If we are going to learn to be alone with God in prayer, we need to slow down and mine everything we can from this short lesson Jesus gave his disciples. John Piper reveals several key insights he has seen in these verses over the years. Visit ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ series page to see all three labs in this series.

Related Resources

•      Does God “Lead Us Into Temptation”? (article)
•      Pornography and Resisting the Power of Temptation (interview)
•      As We Forgive Our Debtors (sermon on Matthew 6:9–13)

Matthew 6:9–13, Part 3

Hallowed Be Your Name

January 8, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:9–13
Topic: Prayer
Series: The Lord’s Prayer

Principle for Bible Reading

There is no more familiar prayer in the Bible than the Lord’s Prayer. In the last lab of his three-part series, John Piper highlights two major new insights he’s seen over the years in the structure and relationships within this paradigm-creating prayer of Jesus.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–02:29)

We are praying to a Father who knows what we need before we ask him. He loves us, and he loves to do these things for us, his adopted children.

Commands, Not Confessions (02:29–06:12)

1.      You might be tempted to think of the first three prayers (God’s name, kingdom, and will) as confessions or acclimations, and not requests, but they really are prayers.
2.      With those three prayers, we really are asking God to act and bring something about. We really are asking or even commanding that he hallow his name, establish his kingdom, and execute his will.
3.      The last three prayers (for food, forgiveness, and protection) are how the first three play out in our daily lives (Matthew 6:11–13). We need these three in order to be an active part of bringing God’s glory, kingdom, and will into the world. We become useless to God’s mission when we die or despair or are (spiritually) destroyed.
4.      There is a global dimension (first three) and a personal dimension (last three) to this prayer.

The Prayer of Prayers (06:12–12:17)

1.      Lots of people think of these six prayers only as two sets of three. The first three are global, spiritual, and kingdom requests, and the second three address our personal and practical needs.
2.      “Hallowed be your name,” though, is a unique and supreme prayer among the others (Matthew 6:9). This request alone directly targets our heart, because only the heart hallows (treasures or reveres or loves).
3.      The other five prayers all culminate in hearts that hallow God’s name. When God answers (acts, provides, forgives, delivers), he gets the glory as his children exult in him (cf. Psalm 5:11).
4.      All of this comes very near to the heart of Christian Hedonism. We might say, “God is most hallowed in us when we are most happy in his holiness.”

Study Questions

1.      Look at the six prayers in Matthew 6:9–13. Do you see any discernable structure? Can they be grouped or categorized?


2.      Describe the nature of the first three prayers. Take each one at a time and ask how they would be fulfilled. Are they fundamentally different in any way from the last three?


3.      Now look at the first prayer, “Hallowed be your name,” in Matthew 6:9. Can you determine any differences from the other five prayers? Is there anything that sets it apart? If so, how does it relate to the others?

‘The Lord’s Prayer’ Series

This lab is part of a series through Jesus’s prayer in Matthew 6:9–13. If we are going to learn to be alone with God in prayer, we need to slow down and mine everything we can from this short lesson Jesus gave his disciples. John Piper reveals several key insights he has seen in these verses over the years. Visit ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ series page to see all three labs in this series.

Related Resources

•      The Deepest Desire of the Christian Heart (article)
•      What Is God’s Glory? (interview)
•      Pray Like This: Hallowed Be Your Name (sermon on Matthew 6:9–13)

Matthew 6:24–34, Part 1

Nine Arguments Against Anxiety

April 23, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:24–34
Topic: Fear & Anxiety
Series: Do Not Be Anxious

Principle for Bible Reading

This three-part series of labs takes on anxiety by studying Matthew 6:24–27. If the Bible is going to effectively speak to our anxious hearts, we need to learn how to read it well. In this lab, John Piper lays out the arguments and gives three short lessons for our daily Bible reading.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–01:25)

Two Assumptions for Reading:

1.      Every passage has a main point.
2.      Every passage uses arguments to support its main point in various ways.

What Is the Main Point? (01:25–06:32)

Main Point: “Do not be anxious.” (Matthew 6:25, 27, 28, 31, 34)
Arguments:

1.      “You cannot serve both God and money” (Matthew 6:24). We know this is an argument because the next verse begins with the word “Therefore”.
2.      “Is not life more than food?” (Matthew 6:25)
3.      “Look at the birds of the air …” (Matthew 6:26)
4.      “Which of you can add a single hour to his life?” (Matthew 6:27)
5.      “Consider the lilies of the field …” (Matthew 6:28–30)
6.      “The Gentiles seek after these things.” (Matthew 6:32)
7.      “Your heavenly Father knows that you need them all.” (Matthew 6:32)
8.      “All these things will be added to you.” (Matthew 6:33)
9.      “Tomorrow will be anxious for itself.” (Matthew 6:34)

Lessons for Bible Reading (06:32–09:16)

1.      The Bible argues. It gives reasons for things. Its thoughts are linked together.
2.      A unit of thought (or passage) has a main point. Everything else in that unit supports in the main point in some way.
3.      To truly understand a passage we must figure out how the arguments support the main point.

Study Questions

1.      Read Matthew 6:24–34. What do you think is the main point of these eleven verses?


2.      Read Matthew 6:24–34 again. How many different arguments do you see that support your main point?


3.      Restate each of the arguments you identified from the previous question in your own words.

Related Resources

•      God Doesn’t Want You to Worry (article)
•      Anxiety: Sin, Disorder, or Both? (interview)
•      Do Not Be Anxious About Your Life (sermon on Matthew 6:24–34)

Matthew 6:24–34, Part 2

Do Not Be Anxious About Tomorrow

April 28, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:24–34
Topic: Fear & Anxiety
Series: Do Not Be Anxious

Principle for Bible Reading

When you think about the future, what makes you most anxious? Jesus gives us plenty of reasons not to fear. In Part 1 of this series, John Piper identified nine arguments against our anxieties. In this lab, he slows down over the first five to highlight how they each help us.

Outline

Recap/Introduction (00:00–03:00)

  1. “You Cannot Serve Both God and Money” (03:00–05:11)
    1. The “therefore” at the beginning of Matthew 6:25 communicates the previous verse is an argument for what comes after (“do not be anxious”).
    2. Do not worry yourself with money and the things money can buy. Do not calculate your life to maximize money and possessions.
    3. You can’t love money as the goal of your life and God as the goal of your life.
  2. “Is Not Life More Than Food?” (05:11–07:04)
    1. You do not lose your life when you lose food, drink, or clothing. Life is more than those things.
    2. Saving your life ultimately is not about keeping yourself alive here.
    3. Do not worry yourself with the things that keep you alive physically, because life is more than physical.
  3. “Look At the Birds of the Air …” (07:04–08:45)
    1. Birds do not have a way to store food. They receive one meal at a time, and they are not anxious about that.
    2. Where do the birds get this food, meal by meal by meal? Your heavenly Father provides for them.
    3. If your Father cares even for the birds in this way, will he not do the same and more for you?
  4. “Which of You Can Add a Single Hour to His Life?” (08:45–09:22)

Anxiety does you no good. It does not effectively help your circumstances in any way.

  1. “Consider the Lilies of the Field …” (09:22–11:47)
    1. The lilies do not make their own clothing. The point is not that they are lazy, but that their garments come from somewhere else (God).
    2. The lilies’ clothing is not only effective, but beautiful.
    3. The lilies are here today and gone tomorrow. Their life is short and seemingly insignificant.
    4. Therefore, if God cares for the lilies like this, will he not do this and more for you?

Study Questions

1.      Explain the “therefore” at the beginning of Matthew 6:25. How does what come before support what comes after?


2.      Read Matthew 6:26–30, and explain the logic under the birds and the lilies illustrations. How do those picture help us not fear?


3.      Jesus says, “your life is more than food” (Matthew 6:25). In what way is life more than food? How specifically does that speak to our anxiety about food?

Related Resources

•      When Fear Seizes You (article)
•      Fear, Anxiety, and Growth in Godliness (interview)
•      Anxieties: To Be Cast Not Carried (sermon on fear and anxiety)

Matthew 6:24–34, Part 3

Your Father Knows What You Need

April 30, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 6:24–34
Topic: Fear & Anxiety
Series: Do Not Be Anxious

Principle for Bible Reading

God wants to comfort and stabilize the anxious with truth. What truths calm our fears? In Part 1, John Piper identified nine arguments against our anxieties. In Part 2, he covered the first five. In this lab, he covers the last four, and highlights six lessons for Bible reading.

Outline

Recap/Introduction (00:00–02:39)

Arguments Against Anxiety from Part 2:

1.      “You Cannot Serve Both God and Money”
2.      “Is Not Life More Than Food?”
3.      “Look At the Birds of the Air …”
4.      “Which of You Can Add a Single Hour to His Life?”
5.      “Consider the Lilies of the Field …”
  1. “The Gentiles Seek After These Things.” (02:39–03:24)
    1. The Gentiles (the nations) are the people who don’t know God, at least not as their Father.
    2. If you’re anxious about what you’ll eat or drink or wear, you’re acting like people who do not know God.
    3. This kind of fear and anxiety, therefore, dishonors God, who you do know as your heavenly Father.
  2. “Your Heavenly Father Knows You Need Them.” (03:24–04:20)
    1. In God, you have a Father, not just a king or a shepherd).
    2. God also knows every need you have.
    3. Neither of these points would be a great comfort by themself, but the two together should keep you from anxiety about your life.
  3. “All These Things Will Be Added to You.” (04:20–05:20)
    1. “These things” refers to all the food, all the drink, all the clothing, and everything else you need.
    2. We know, though, not all Christians have their basic needs. Christians all over die from hunger or thirst or nakedness.
    3. This verse, therefore, does not promise you will not die of hunger or nakedness. It promises that God will give you everything you need now to prepare you for the life to come, the life that lasts.
  4. “Tomorrow Will Be Anxious for Itself.” (05:20–06:22)
    1. There is trouble for every day, and there will be grace for that trouble every day.
    2. We know there are new mercies every morning (just like there are new troubles every morning). (Lamentations 3:23).
    3. Tomorrow’s troubles are not designed to be dealt with today’s grace. Every day has its sufficient trouble, as well as its sufficient grace.
    Lessons for Bible Reading (06:22–11:32) Lessons from Part 1:
    1. The Bible argues. It gives reasons for things. Its thoughts are linked together.
    2. A unit of thought (or passage) has a main point. Everything else in that unit supports in the main point in some way.
    3. To truly understand a passage we must figure out how the arguments support the main point.
    More Lessons:
    1. Jesus assumes that truth affects/influences the emotions.
    2. Truth has its affect on our emotions when it is believed, when we have faith.
    3. Therefore, pray for faith and meditate on his truth.

Study Questions

1.      What are “these things” in Matthew 6:32–33? How can Jesus say God will give us all these things when we know Christians die without them every day?


2.      Why do the Gentiles seek after “these things”? According to Matthew 6:32, why is their example a bad one to follow?


3.      Read Lamentations 3:21–23 (with Matthew 6:34). In God’s care and provision, what is the relationship between today’s grace and today’s trouble? What about between today’s grace and tomorrow’s trouble?

Related Resources

•      Help Me Face Today (article)
•      The Fear That Haunts Humanity (interview)
•      Battling the Unbelief of Anxiety (sermon on fear and anxiety)

Matthew 10:25–31

Have No Fear of Them

November 20, 2014
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 10:25–31
Topic: Fear & Anxiety

Principle for Bible Reading

“Do not fear.” Jesus’s command can be hard to obey, but it is filled with promise. In this lab, John Piper shows us how Jesus helps his disciples (and us) battle fear.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–00:32)

Jesus’s Commands (00:32–03:20)

1.      “Have no fear of them.” (Matthew 10:26)
2.      “Say in the light … proclaim on the housetops.” (Matthew 10:27)
3.      “Do not fear …” (Matthew 10:28)
4.      “Fear God.” (Matthew 10:28)
5.      “Fear not.” (Matthew 10:28)

Main point: Do not fear man. Fear God, and boldly proclaim his truth.

Jesus’s Arguments (03:20–10:25)

1.      If they malign you, then you are in good company with Jesus. If you are mistreated for his sake, you know that you are his. (Matthew 10:25)
2.      The truth will be revealed and vindicated one day. The things we say now about God will be proved by God before the world. (Matthew 10:26)
3.      Your enemies cannot destroy you. They can kill you, but they can not destroy. They can only dispatch you to heaven. (Matthew 10:28)
4.      God can destroy you, therefore you do not want him to be against you. God can do much greater harm to you than man. (Matthew 10:28)
5.      God pervasively governs all the details of the world, even the most insignificant things, like the death of a sparrow. And God values you more than the sparrows. And he is very attentive toward you. (Matthew 10:29–31)

Summary (10:25–11:45)

Study Questions

1.      Read through Matthew 10:25–31 one time and list all of the commands. Do you notice a theme in the commands?


2.      How many arguments does Jesus use in Matthew 10:25–31 to persuade his disciples not to fear? Identify them and say each of them in your own words.


3.      Why is it good news that we are “of more value than the sparrows” (Matthew 10:31)?

Recents Labs from John Piper

1.      “Love Builds Up” on 1 Corinthians 8:1–3
2.      “The Spirit in You Is Life” on Romans 8:10–11
3.      “You Are Not Your Own” on Romans 8:9

Related Resources

•      Reasons Believers in Christ Need Not to Be Afraid (article)
•      What Does It Mean for the Christian to Fear God? (interview)
•      Even the Hairs of My Head Are All Numbered (sermon on Matthew 10:25–31)

Matthew 22:15–21

Render to Caesar

March 10, 2015
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 22:15–21
Topic: Government

Principle for Bible Reading

Jesus does not always give us every answer explicitly. Sometimes he wants us to think and come to the right answer for ourselves, like when the Pharisees tried to trap him over taxes. In this lab, John Piper helps us understand how we relate to the government by highlighting God’s governing of all things.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–00:55)

Is It Lawful to Pay Taxes? (00:55–06:43)

1.      The Pharisees and Herodians wanted to entangle Jesus over the issue of taxes. If Jesus says they ought to pay, he betrays the Jews who resented the Romans. If he says do not pay, he would be in trouble with Caesar and the Romans. Either conflict could undo him and his influence.
2.      The malice in the question springs from envy. Even Pilate knew the Jews were handing Jesus over out of envy. (Matthew 27:18)
3.      Jesus asks them to bring him a denarius and show him the face on the coin. He answers them by saying they ought to give to Caesar what it Caesar’s, and to God what it God’s.
4.      Jesus did not deal with the scope of Caesar’s sphere of power and possession, or God’s. He also does not deal with the relationship between Caesar’s sphere and God’s.

Give to God What Is God’s (06:43–11:56)

1.      Everything belongs to God, meaning the things that belong to Caesar do not belong to him ultimately. All of his possession is derivative. (Matthew 22:21; John 19:11)
2.      Therefore, Caesar’s rights and claims over you are limited. If Caesar calls us to do anything God prohibits, we refuse. (Acts 5:29)
3.      Caesar’s influence and our allegiance to him are shaped by God’s superior possession and authority. We render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s as an act of worship to God. (Ephesians 5:22; 6:7)

Study Questions

1.      Why did the Pharisees and the Herodians think their question would entangle Jesus (Matthew 22:15–16)? What made the question so difficult (even impossible) in their minds?


2.      Why does Jesus call them hypocrites for asking that question (Matthew 22:18)?


3.      Jesus doesn’t answer their question directly, but his answer does suggest a lot. List two or three implications you see in Jesus’s answer (Matthew 22:21).

Related Resources

•      Render to Caesar the Things That Are Caesar’s (article)
•      Does Romans 13 Prohibit All Civil Disobedience? (interview)
•      Subjection to God and Subjection to the State, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4 (sermons)

Matthew 28:18–20

I Am with You Always

September 23, 2014
by John Piper
Scripture: Matthew 28:18–20
Topic: Missions

Principle for Bible Reading

Some of God’s commands in the Bible are very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, we need to pay close attention to the promises in Scripture that accompany God’s commands and equip us with God’s power to do the impossible.

Outline

Introduction/Prayer/Overview (00:00–01:57)

1.      Six Commands
2.      Two Promises (Jesus’s Authority and Presence)

Commands (01:57–04:26)

1.      Go. (Matthew 28:19)
2.      Make disciples. (Matthew 28:19)
3.      Take the gospel to all the nations. (Matthew 28:19)
4.      Baptize them. (Matthew 28:19)
5.      Make plain the Trinity. (Matthew 28:19)
6.      Teach them to obey. (Matthew 28:20)

Promises (04:26–07:38)

1.      “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (Matthew 28:18). We have the warrant and power to fulfill Jesus’s commission.
2.      “And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:20). There will never be a moment or a circumstance in which I won’t be with you.

Study Questions

1.      How many separate commands can you identify in Matthew 28:18–20? Are there commands or facets of commands that you missed before?


2.      What promise(s), if any, does Jesus make to his disciples in these verses?


3.      How do Jesus’s commands and promises relate to one another in Matthew 28:18–20?

Related Resources

•      The Greatest Challenge in the World (article)
•      Is Direct Human Contact Important In Evangelism and Church Life? (interview)
•      Jesus Christ: Alive and With Us to the End (sermon)

Piper, J. (2014–2015). Look at the Book Labs (Mt 6,9–28,20). Minneapolis, MN: Desiring God.

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